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Couchsurfing: Hits and Misses. Mostly Misses.

I debated on whether or not I should even write about this; however, I realize that many people will try to find housing alternatives that either is cheap or free in order to save money for experiences. Back in the beginning of the year, I was swimming in blog posts and reading everything I could in preparation for my trip to Germany and the Netherlands.  Although Germany is relatively cheap, housing anywhere is usually the one to eat up most of your funds (next to airfare of course).  Each blogger I reached out to always suggested Couchsurfing. The idea of sleeping on someone’s couch didn’t deter me, but having to essentially live with a stranger for any length of time was not something I was prepared to do.

When you have to write this in a profile…ugh.

Creating a profile was easy.  Finding people who would allow me to stay in their home proved to be a test of patience. On Couchsurfing just AirBnb, people can leave reviews for other hosts to read.  The problem was, I was just starting out and I hadn’t been hosted by anyone yet. No reviews and I’m basically having to give a sales pitch each time I email a potential host. Given that it is all part of the process, I relentlessly contacted anyone who might have similar interests.  Unfortunately, this isn’t AirBnb and nobody is legally bound to a calendar date.  More times than not, I would receive an email from a host telling me they were going on an impromptu trip and were not going to be able to host me.  In other words, hosts usually are nomads and travel junkies themselves (not a bad thing), and sure things will come up, that’s life, so don’t expect your dates to be set in stone.

After creating a profile and finding hosts, I had to deal with creepers.  Yes, somebody had to say it. I don’t care how many people try to romanticize this notion that all is kum-ba-ya, you will encounter people who create a fake profile to meet potential hookups.  I think you’re looking for Grindr, buddy.

The Schönefeld Incident

He never responded and then blocked me. LOL.

He assured me he’d be there to pick me up at the airport.  He and his girlfriend had a loft where I would have been able to stay, but for this part of the trip, but I decided to go with an AirBnb rental and had to decline the offer. Although I kept telling him that I didn’t need the ride into Berlin, he insisted.  I found that odd and after a while, there was no mention of the girlfriend.  My plane in Copenhagen was delayed by 3 hours and my plan to arrive in Berlin in time for dinner now turned into a mission to get to the loft safely. We had been communicating since my departure from LAX. Once I arrived in Berlin, I waited outside for him.  An hour passed, and I didn’t even get a text on WhatsApp. I mustered up the strength and walked to the bahnhof only to realize that the last train departed 10 minutes before I got there. Upon my return, I see a young man looking for someone.  I look down at my phone to see his face matching the picture on the WhatsApp profile. Next, a pretty young girl catches his eye and he’s all over that. He’s putting on the moves and I’m watching all of it unfold less than 10 feet away. I couldn’t help but laugh.  They both enter the terminal and at that point I went with an Uber instead. Yes, it was expensive, but I also traveled at ludicrous speed on the Autobahn and saw plaid. The next day he tries to explain himself. He was such a bad liar and I didn’t care.

The Volksbar Incident

After a restless night, I gave in to lure of Berlin and ventured out. Next time, I’ll give myself a day to rest. I was under the impression that I was doing a Couchsurfing meetup, so there wasn’t anything to worry about. Within an hour I was at Alexanderplatz, lost.  We exchanged a few texts over WhatsApp and finally decided to meet by the KFC. There he greeted me and I was wondering where the rest of the people were hiding. He tells me we are meeting them at Volksbar and we need to catch another train to get there. Distancing myself from him, I sense that he’s looking for more than coffee. When we arrive at Volksbar, it is quite empty and it looks like we are now on some kind of date. I’m livid, but I stay to buy myself some time on how to figure out how to get back to the loft. I remind him that I am a married woman and that I met up with him thinking we were going to a meetup with OTHER people. As I’m leaving he grabs me and forces his tongue down my throat. I proceed to hit him in hopes that he will get off, but he’s on me like a leech. When he finally decides he’s been abused enough, I start to walk away yelling at him to get away from me.  He begins to follow me and insists that he needs to take me home because it’s unsafe for me to go riding the train alone back to Wedding. BULLSHIT. I remember a few landmarks, find a bahnhof and descend to the platform. Standing beside a mother and a child to give myself a buffer between me and him, he makes matters worse by suggesting that I take him back to the loft for a nightcap. Finally after 10 minutes and knowing that he’s not going to win me over, he walks towards another train car and leaves in the opposite direction.

The “What is that on my arm and NECK?!” Incident

Jay was a great host.  After that, I can’t say much. I guess with this case, I was more disappointed than anything else. He never made me feel uncomfortable and was always very respectful. I woke up to either a nice cup of coffee or a beer and someone who was willing to help me explore their city. The issue at hand was cleanliness.  While some might agree that I shouldn’t be bitching about a free place to stay, that being said, I believe there’s a level of cleanliness that people should adhere to if they are going to open their homes to travelers or anyone for that matter. The first night at Jay’s place was short since we had been out most of the night exploring Amsterdam; however, by sunrise I woke up scratching bites on my arm.  My first instinct was to try to remember if I had walked into something! Well, I wasn’t that drunk. I checked the bedding and it looked less than appealing. At the moment I didn’t want to deal with it since I was on my way to Haarlem. The following day, I woke up with the bites seen in the picture below. I went ahead and just booked an AirBnb and slipped the keys underneath the door with a thank you note.

Nope! Nope! Nope!

The Everyone Decides to Message me while I’m in Berlin/Amsterdam Incident

Ok so this one isn’t really an incident per se, but it was annoying as hell! When I touched down in Denmark, I was receiving notifications left and right, but by then I already booked accommodations for the entire trip. Instead, many hosts offered to meet up for coffee, drinks or dinner. Even when an open itinerary, I don’t think it would have possible to meet up with everyone, so I didn’t take anyone up on their offer. Also after the run-ins with other Couchsurfers, I didn’t feel lucky playing Russian roulette one more time.

The Verdict

Despite all the good reviews, I think I’ll pass on Couchsurfing from now on.  It was probably a fluke that these events all happened within a two-week span; yet, it was enough to establish in my mind that sometimes free is costly. Since I haven’t had an issue with AirBnb as of yet, I will stick with them instead. I’ve also realized that I’m a very independent traveler who likes to have an open itinerary, something that could be hindered by adhering to a host’s schedule. I was lucky enough to have my own key at Jay’s, but that isn’t always the case from what I’ve heard.

I’ve slept on floors, in cars (VW bus and bug to be exact), and outside so my threshold is high; however, the need to feel safe and not end up in a dermatologist’s office are quite important to me.

What are your thoughts?  Did you have positive or negative Couchsurfing experiences? Please share them in the comments below!

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